* denotes required field

Your Name: *

FIRST NAME

 LAST NAME

Gender: *

Personal Email: *

This will be your username

Password: *

Display Name: *

This will be what others see in social areas of the site.

Address: *

STREET ADDRESS (LINE 1) *

 

STREET ADDRESS (LINE 2)

 

CITY *

STATE *

ZIP *

 

 

Phone Number:

School/University: *

Graduation Date: *

Date of Birth: *

ASDA Membership No:



ABOUT SSL CERTIFICATES

Username

 

Password

Hi returning User! please login with Facebook credentials where Facebook Username is same as THENEXTDDS Username.

Username

 

Password

 
Back to Forums

Forum Category: General Dentistry

Moderated by:
TheNEXTDDS Admin

E-Cigarettes and Oral Health: What Could They Mean for the Future?

The effects of the long-term use of e-cigarettes are unknown and, according to the National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research (NIDCR), “present a potential oral and periodontal disease risk for users due to their higher exposure to the chemical mixtures.”

In a letter sent to the Food and Drug Administration on December 9, 2014, Drs. Maxine Feinberg, ADA president, and Kathleen O’Loughlin, ADA executive director, advocate for more research on the long-term effects of e-cigarettes on oral health, stating, “The lack of published literature makes it virtually impossible to justify the claims that these products are somehow less harmful to the oral cavity than combustible tobacco products or without other adverse effects.”

The NIDCR has begun an initiative to encourage research on the effects of e-cigarette aerosol mixtures on oral and periodontal epithelial cells. The initiative will support the: 1) comprehensive identification of chemicals produced by e-cigarettes; 2) analysis of synergistic effects of e-cigarette aerosol mixtures on oral and periodontal epithelia; and, 3) effects of e-cigarettes on oral homeostasis.

The use of e-cigarettes among smokers, non-smokers, and adolescents indicate a troubling trend that could pose a widespread public health problem. According to the NIDCR, e-cigarettes will surpass the sales of tobacco cigarettes within a decade if they remain unregulated. The agency stresses there is an urgent need to determine the biological effects of the vaporizing liquid to generate evidenced-based health policies and regulations. However, current differences in product engineering, components, and potential toxicities make it difficult to discuss e-cigarettes as one product group.

Public health concerns regarding e-cigarette use include: 1) devices may provide a gateway to smoking for younger people, including children; 2) use of these products may increase the risk of nonsmokers developing an addiction to nicotine; and, 3) current smokers will maintain their addiction.

While smoking/tobacco cessation does not reverse the past effects of use, patients who quit have been shown to respond to non-surgical and surgical periodontal therapy similarly to never smokers. Implementing a cessation program as part of the dental practice may become increasingly necessary. Intervention models range from a brief intervention program, which offers patient information, encouragement, and support, to a comprehensive intervention program, which includes the identification of a cessation activity coordinator and combines counseling, pharmacological therapy, and follow-up supportive efforts.

The health concerns surrounding the e-cigarette are particularly alarming for you as a future dental professional. You will need to advocate for smoking/tobacco cessation with your patients to help curb the prevalence of periodontal disease in your patients. 

Community Rating:
Your Rating?
Comments

E-Cigarettes and Oral Health: What Could They Mean for the Future?

07:21 PM | Jan 18,2017
I see more and more people using e-cigs. I also have an increasing number of patients who report using e-cigs. Often I find that I have to be much more detailed when taking medical histories, because patients do not consider e-cigs to be a "tobacco product" and often won't disclose or don't know to bring it up during that section if I don't specifically ask. We do have a great tobacco cessation program through the AU Cancer Center, which I have referred patients to before. I'll be interested to see more long term studies on e-cigarettes and see if we can have clinical guidelines based on research.

E-Cigarettes and Oral Health: What Could They Mean for the Future?

12:35 PM | Dec 19,2016
At Texas A&M College of Dentistry we have an amazing smoking cessation program. We perform a comprehensive tobacco history for each patient, and if they show any interest in quitting, we refer them to our counseling program available for FREE to them through the school. I have spoken with the director of this program concerning the E-cig trend. They view E-sigs as a "temporary" cessation aid, which should not be suggested as a cessation aid if they never plan on giving up E-cigs. In other words, the focus should be given to traditional pharmacological cessation aids in addition to counseling, and many of the other intervention models you have listed above. The goal should be complete freedom from any harmful habits. However, as many other comments on here have suggested, if E-sigs are acceptable to the patient as a less harmful replacement to a traditional cigarette, it makes sense to me that this step should be encouraged, and then supplemented by traditional interventions.

E-Cigarettes and Oral Health: What Could They Mean for the Future?

03:47 AM | Jul 09,2016
I understand that we don't know the long term side effects of e-cigs, and I think we(dental community) should do more to get data on e-cigs. However, I think we can safely say right now that they are better than regular cigarettes.

E-Cigarettes and Oral Health: What Could They Mean for the Future?

03:47 AM | Jul 09,2016
I understand that we don't know the long term side effects of e-cigs, and I think we(dental community) should do more to get data on e-cigs. However, I think we can safely say right now that they are better than regular cigarettes.

E-Cigarettes and Oral Health: What Could They Mean for the Future?

11:09 AM | Jun 27,2016
Great post! The thing I find most disturbing is that patients actually believe they have quit smoking. I had a patient that told me that they have stopped smoking two years ago. I was about to congratulate them, but then they told me "I only smoke e-cigs." I did not know what to say at that point. I couldn't say they are safer because we really do not know. It becomes exceedingly difficult to give advice without evidence. It is almost like we went back to the 1950s and do not know the harmful effects of tobacco. Could it be possible that e-cigs cause even more oral cancer? We are so used to knowing the answers to these type of questions, but at this point we are dumbfounded. This is most certainly an area that will be researched extensively, we do not want to make the same mistake twice. Hopefully the e-cig industry does not become as powerful as the tobacco industry was back in the 50s. The tobacco industry paid scientist to purposefully create bogus research to create confusion even though they knew back in the 50s the detrimental and addictive effects of tobacoo use they postponed serious legislation until to 90s. The same goes for the Oil and Gas industry today who are creating doubt among the population regarding global warming even though the scientific community has already determined that it is happening and is caused by humans. I am sure there will be backlash from the e-cig industry if any research finds e-cigs to have a harmful effect to humans.

E-Cigarettes and Oral Health: What Could They Mean for the Future?

06:50 PM | Jun 10,2016
Please tell me more!

E-Cigarettes and Oral Health: What Could They Mean for the Future?

05:41 PM | Mar 30,2016
I am deeply troubled by the new fad of E-Cigarettes and what it means for the world my children will grow up in. As a child I was taught that smoking was bad and to resist peer pressure so I don't end up with cancer which is for the most part true. A big part of the successful pushback on smoking was when it became illegal for big tobacco corporations to advertise on commercials, which pervaded into the minds of impressionable children that smoking was okay, even cool or sophisticated. With the rise of the E-Cigarettes and vaping, these corporations are able to bypass the laws that were put in place to protect our children and advertise without any repercussions since they aren't advertising the tobacco, they are advertising the instrument by which it is inhaled. In my mind, it will be too late if we sit back and wait for studies to prove what we already know: that smoking, in any form, is generally a risk factor for overall health. The first step to solving the problem is to start teaching that E-Cigarettes are bad in schools and the second step is to outlaw companies from advertising E-Cigarettes just like they outlaw regular cigarettes.

E-Cigarettes and Oral Health: What Could They Mean for the Future?

05:40 PM | Mar 30,2016
I am deeply troubled by the new fad of E-Cigarettes and what it means for the world my children will grow up in. As a child I was taught that smoking was bad and to resist peer pressure so I don't end up with cancer which is for the most part true. A big part of the successful pushback on smoking was when it became illegal for big tobacco corporations to advertise on commercials, which pervaded into the minds of impressionable children that smoking was okay, even cool or sophisticated. With the rise of the E-Cigarettes and vaping, these corporations are able to bypass the laws that were put in place to protect our children and advertise without any repercussions since they aren't advertising the tobacco, they are advertising the instrument by which it is inhaled. In my mind, it will be too late if we sit back and wait for studies to prove what we already know: that smoking, in any form, is generally a risk factor for overall health. The first step to solving the problem is to start teaching that E-Cigarettes are bad in schools and the second step is to outlaw companies from advertising E-Cigarettes just like they outlaw regular cigarettes.

E-Cigarettes and Oral Health: What Could They Mean for the Future?

09:31 PM | Feb 21,2016
Long term effect studies still need to be addressed, however few studies are already are shedding light that the e-cig may be less harmful to the user than the conventional cigarette. Cigarette smoking caused a significant decrease in forced expiratory volume which was not seen in e-cigarettes use. Smoking increased white blood cell count, which reflects an inflammatory response, whereas there was no change with the use of e-cigs. (Flouris AD, Chorti MS, Poulianiti KP, Jamurtas AZ, Kostikas K, Tzatzarakis MN, Wallace Hayes A et al. Acute impact of active and passive electronic cigarette smoking on serum cotinine and lung function. Inhal Toxicol. 2013; 25:91-101) Smokers with Asthma who switched to e-cigs found no adverse side effects of e-cigs, but rather, e-cigs improved pulmonary function and reduced severity of asthma (Polosa R, Morjaria J, Caponnetto P et al. Effect of smoking abstinence and reduction is asthmatic smokers switching to electronic cigarettes; evidence for harm reversal. Int J Environ Res Public Health. 2014; 11:4965-4977) Air analysis generated by e-cig releveled presence of chemicals but at levels 5-40 times lower than those generated by a conventional cigarette (Schripp T, Markewitz D, Uhde E et al. Does e-cigarette consumption cause passive vaping? Indoor Air. 2013; 23:25-31) With FDA regulation, these may become and even safer alternative. My father was someone who smoked 1.5 packs a day for decades. He tried to quit using conventional methods (nicotine patches,prescription medicines) but was unsuccessful. Tired of seeing him damage himself this way, I decided to perform my own little experiment. I transitioned him to e-cigarettes on an extra high nicotine level 18-24 mg/ml. After a month he couldn't stand the taste of his conventional cigarettes. Over the next 2 years we have been able to slowly wean him off the nicotine to a level of 6 mg/ml. My father was very excited as he now began to feel somewhat free of his nicotine addiction. He longer experienced the cravings and panic that he use to. At this point it seemed that he's more addicted to the habit that the actual nicotine. I continued to push him until he finally curbed the habit. While this story is completely anecdotal, it has given me a different perspective on the role e-cigs may play in our society. Public health concerns are valid, and using evidence based research to establish our clinical guidelines has been more important than ever. I continue to keep tabs on the developing research and am excited and hopeful that this evolution in smoking could potentially replace a much more dangerous alternative.

E-Cigarettes and Oral Health: What Could They Mean for the Future?

09:31 PM | Feb 21,2016
Long term effect studies still need to be addressed, however few studies are already are shedding light that the e-cig may be less harmful to the user than the conventional cigarette. Cigarette smoking caused a significant decrease in forced expiratory volume which was not seen in e-cigarettes use. Smoking increased white blood cell count, which reflects an inflammatory response, whereas there was no change with the use of e-cigs. (Flouris AD, Chorti MS, Poulianiti KP, Jamurtas AZ, Kostikas K, Tzatzarakis MN, Wallace Hayes A et al. Acute impact of active and passive electronic cigarette smoking on serum cotinine and lung function. Inhal Toxicol. 2013; 25:91-101) Smokers with Asthma who switched to e-cigs found no adverse side effects of e-cigs, but rather, e-cigs improved pulmonary function and reduced severity of asthma (Polosa R, Morjaria J, Caponnetto P et al. Effect of smoking abstinence and reduction is asthmatic smokers switching to electronic cigarettes; evidence for harm reversal. Int J Environ Res Public Health. 2014; 11:4965-4977) Air analysis generated by e-cig releveled presence of chemicals but at levels 5-40 times lower than those generated by a conventional cigarette (Schripp T, Markewitz D, Uhde E et al. Does e-cigarette consumption cause passive vaping? Indoor Air. 2013; 23:25-31) With FDA regulation, these may become and even safer alternative. My father was someone who smoked 1.5 packs a day for decades. He tried to quit using conventional methods (nicotine patches,prescription medicines) but was unsuccessful. Tired of seeing him damage himself this way, I decided to perform my own little experiment. I transitioned him to e-cigarettes on an extra high nicotine level 18-24 mg/ml. After a month he couldn't stand the taste of his conventional cigarettes. Over the next 2 years we have been able to slowly wean him off the nicotine to a level of 6 mg/ml. My father was very excited as he now began to feel somewhat free of his nicotine addiction. He longer experienced the cravings and panic that he use to. At this point it seemed that he's more addicted to the habit that the actual nicotine. I continued to push him until he finally curbed the habit. While this story is completely anecdotal, it has given me a different perspective on the role e-cigs may play in our society. Public health concerns are valid, and using evidence based research to establish our clinical guidelines has been more important than ever. I continue to keep tabs on the developing research and am excited and hopeful that this evolution in smoking could potentially replace a much more dangerous alternative.

E-Cigarettes and Oral Health: What Could They Mean for the Future?

09:31 PM | Feb 21,2016
Long term effect studies still need to be addressed, however few studies are already are shedding light that the e-cig may be less harmful to the user than the conventional cigarette. Cigarette smoking caused a significant decrease in forced expiratory volume which was not seen in e-cigarettes use. Smoking increased white blood cell count, which reflects an inflammatory response, whereas there was no change with the use of e-cigs. (Flouris AD, Chorti MS, Poulianiti KP, Jamurtas AZ, Kostikas K, Tzatzarakis MN, Wallace Hayes A et al. Acute impact of active and passive electronic cigarette smoking on serum cotinine and lung function. Inhal Toxicol. 2013; 25:91-101) Smokers with Asthma who switched to e-cigs found no adverse side effects of e-cigs, but rather, e-cigs improved pulmonary function and reduced severity of asthma (Polosa R, Morjaria J, Caponnetto P et al. Effect of smoking abstinence and reduction is asthmatic smokers switching to electronic cigarettes; evidence for harm reversal. Int J Environ Res Public Health. 2014; 11:4965-4977) Air analysis generated by e-cig releveled presence of chemicals but at levels 5-40 times lower than those generated by a conventional cigarette (Schripp T, Markewitz D, Uhde E et al. Does e-cigarette consumption cause passive vaping? Indoor Air. 2013; 23:25-31) With FDA regulation, these may become and even safer alternative. My father was someone who smoked 1.5 packs a day for decades. He tried to quit using conventional methods (nicotine patches,prescription medicines) but was unsuccessful. Tired of seeing him damage himself this way, I decided to perform my own little experiment. I transitioned him to e-cigarettes on an extra high nicotine level 18-24 mg/ml. After a month he couldn't stand the taste of his conventional cigarettes. Over the next 2 years we have been able to slowly wean him off the nicotine to a level of 6 mg/ml. My father was very excited as he now began to feel somewhat free of his nicotine addiction. He longer experienced the cravings and panic that he use to. At this point it seemed that he's more addicted to the habit that the actual nicotine. I continued to push him until he finally curbed the habit. While this story is completely anecdotal, it has given me a different perspective on the role e-cigs may play in our society. Public health concerns are valid, and using evidence based research to establish our clinical guidelines has been more important than ever. I continue to keep tabs on the developing research and am excited and hopeful that this evolution in smoking could potentially replace a much more dangerous alternative.

E-Cigarettes and Oral Health: What Could They Mean for the Future?

09:31 PM | Feb 21,2016
Long term effect studies still need to be addressed, however few studies are already are shedding light that the e-cig may be less harmful to the user than the conventional cigarette. Cigarette smoking caused a significant decrease in forced expiratory volume which was not seen in e-cigarettes use. Smoking increased white blood cell count, which reflects an inflammatory response, whereas there was no change with the use of e-cigs. (Flouris AD, Chorti MS, Poulianiti KP, Jamurtas AZ, Kostikas K, Tzatzarakis MN, Wallace Hayes A et al. Acute impact of active and passive electronic cigarette smoking on serum cotinine and lung function. Inhal Toxicol. 2013; 25:91-101) Smokers with Asthma who switched to e-cigs found no adverse side effects of e-cigs, but rather, e-cigs improved pulmonary function and reduced severity of asthma (Polosa R, Morjaria J, Caponnetto P et al. Effect of smoking abstinence and reduction is asthmatic smokers switching to electronic cigarettes; evidence for harm reversal. Int J Environ Res Public Health. 2014; 11:4965-4977) Air analysis generated by e-cig releveled presence of chemicals but at levels 5-40 times lower than those generated by a conventional cigarette (Schripp T, Markewitz D, Uhde E et al. Does e-cigarette consumption cause passive vaping? Indoor Air. 2013; 23:25-31) With FDA regulation, these may become and even safer alternative. My father was someone who smoked 1.5 packs a day for decades. He tried to quit using conventional methods (nicotine patches,prescription medicines) but was unsuccessful. Tired of seeing him damage himself this way, I decided to perform my own little experiment. I transitioned him to e-cigarettes on an extra high nicotine level 18-24 mg/ml. After a month he couldn't stand the taste of his conventional cigarettes. Over the next 2 years we have been able to slowly wean him off the nicotine to a level of 6 mg/ml. My father was very excited as he now began to feel somewhat free of his nicotine addiction. He longer experienced the cravings and panic that he use to. At this point it seemed that he's more addicted to the habit that the actual nicotine. I continued to push him until he finally curbed the habit. While this story is completely anecdotal, it has given me a different perspective on the role e-cigs may play in our society. Public health concerns are valid, and using evidence based research to establish our clinical guidelines has been more important than ever. I continue to keep tabs on the developing research and am excited and hopeful that this evolution in smoking could potentially replace a much more dangerous alternative.

E-Cigarettes and Oral Health: What Could They Mean for the Future?

11:39 PM | Feb 15,2016
This is a very interesting and timely topic. E-cigarettes are everywhere! And it seems that many people are using them indoors. Aside from E-cigarettes, I would be extremely curious to know more about the oral health risks of marijuana. With it already being legal in four states, and many more surely to come, it seems important to add this drug to the list of things that we should push for more research on. Perhaps there is already a lot of research done on it, but I don't recall having learned anything about it in dental school. Does anyone have any information or resources?

E-Cigarettes and Oral Health: What Could They Mean for the Future?

08:53 PM | Dec 17,2015
I think this is an incredibly important topic for our society today. As dental professionals, it's our duty to be armed with the correct knowledge to educate patients and others with whom we come into contact. We need to definitely push for more research in order to adequately back up our claims of e-cigarettes presenting a "potential oral and periodontal disease risk". The idea of E-cigarettes and their harm brings up another point. We need to focus on other sources of tobacco use other than cigarette smoking and use the information we have to educate our patients. Many individuals smoke hookah (even many dental students) and think it's harmless because its method of inhalation is different. Hookah smoking is seen by college students as "smoking safer than smoking cigarettes", according to a University of South Florida College of Public Health study. Research from the Journal of the American Dental Association found that waterpipe smoking is associated with gum disease, oral cancer, esophageal cancer and dry sockets, among other serious health conditions like lung cancer and heart disease. In fact, the World Health Organization stated that a single waterpipe session with a hookah is equivalent to smoking 100 cigarettes. Hopefully we can start to educate both ourselves and others to spread the word of the dangers of multiple forms of tobacco.

E-Cigarettes and Oral Health: What Could They Mean for the Future?

03:43 PM | Dec 14,2015
It is definitely necessary to determine what the effects of e-cigarettes are because the use have been increasing year by year. But, with any product it does take a few years to gather a substantial amount of data to have an evidence based response to back the idea that they are bad for you. Until then we will have to inform our patients that we are not sure of the harmful effects at the moment but inhaling vapors cannot be better then not. There is a change in the oral environment with anything we ingest and e-cigarettes won't be any different. For now we must warn our patients against the unknown and hope that years for now the effects are not too detrimental.

E-Cigarettes and Oral Health: What Could They Mean for the Future?

09:21 AM | Oct 28,2015
We are currently living in a litigious society where what that we do should be supported by evidence. If we as oral healthcare providers adopt an evidence based approach, if concerns are ever raised we have a solid foundation to stand upon that supports our actions. Smoking is definitely an area that has largely contributed to numerous detrimental health issues and ultimately smoking cessation is encouraged for every patient that I treat because the data that exists supports it!

E-Cigarettes and Oral Health: What Could They Mean for the Future?

05:24 PM | Oct 25,2015
Research on the effects of e-cigarettes is definitely an area that needs to be addressed. I have found it a common misconception among family as well as friends that many people think e-cigarettes are less harmful than regular cigarettes. However, without the proper research we can't properly educate people on the potential harm of e-cigarettes. Hopefully with new evidence-based research dental care professional will be able to educate their patients on the potential risks of e-cigarettes. More so, I agree, dentists should take into consideration offering e-cigarette cessation programs in their office as we become more aware of the potential health hazards they may cause.