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Forum Category: Implantology

Moderated by:
John Papa

Biological Space

In my experience, the concept of “biologic width” is often misunderstood by dental professionals. While this concept has existed in the literature for nearly 50 years, the term biologic width itself does not describe an anatomical entity, but rather the properties or function of such a structure.

In fact, what it called the “biologic width” is actually the mucosal barrier or “safety seal”, composed of the junctional epithelium and connective tissue that protects, defends, and seals the inner from the external environment. Some clinicians may include the gingival suculus in their definition of the biologic width but this, in its strictest sense, is inaccurate.

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Biological Space

07:44 AM | Jun 14,2012
It would be great if you could share more on this topic. Even the article on Biological Space seems like the content most us have visited here. What else!?!

Biological Space

03:48 PM | Feb 27,2012

Biological Space

03:44 PM | Apr 08,2011
Really interesting. It is strange how even among dental professionals, there can be different definitions for something as seemingly simple as this.

Biological Space

03:43 PM | Apr 08,2011
Additionally, the mucosal barrier is a three-dimensional structure—and the term biological width implies only two dimensions. At the time of its origin, the appropriate phrase should have been “biologic space”. Because of these issues, there has long been some confusion on the visualization of this anatomically important protective structure (and its occasional violation).